Telescopic Sight: When you buy a telescopic sight for the first time, you may have the impression that you will not know how to mount it properly on your rifle and, usually, you go to friends or professionals who can help you do it so that your viewer is fully adjusted to your gun and put to zero.

In this article, I will give you some guidelines on how you can do it yourself in a simple way and with words that you understand to make it even easier for you. This process has no mystery, and that is why, when you finish reading this post, you will realize how easy it is.

What do the numbers on a telescopic scope mean?

I am referring to the nomenclature that appears in the sights, such as 24 X 50 or 6-24 x 50, which is usually a standard format and which provide you with all the performance information you can expect.

Telescopic Sight

⇒ Fixed magnification view (ex: 24 x 50)

The first number indicates the number of times you can increase what you are looking at, in this case, it would increase 24 times the actual size. The higher this number, the greater the increase. The second number (measured in mm) is the degree of opening, that is, the diameter of the head of the scope (the front part of the scope). The higher that number, the greater the visual field and the greater the light input.

With this last point you have to be careful because the larger the diameter of the scope, depending on the rifle that you are going to use, it will force you to take it off so you can install it to the stock, so your face will be low, and it will be difficult to focus.

⇒ Look for variable magnification (3-9 x 50)

In this case, the first two numbers mean that you can increase the size of what you are seeing 3 times to 9 times. Likewise, the second number means the degree of opening or diameter of the head of the scope, which is measured in mm. These sights are ideal for all those who practice long distance shooting.

Tips for buying an excellent telescopic sight

So that the view is of good quality and allows you to work with her in all light environments, you have to spend as much or more money than the cost of the rifle. The quality of the scope is measured according to the quality of the crystals with which it is manufactured and the sharpness it offers from the environment in lousy lighting conditions.

Keep in mind that a look is not to buy it every day, on the contrary, it is possible that you change your rifle and the watch will continue to be worth it because, if you take good care of it and choose the one that best suits what you are looking for, you can last a lifetime

If you plan to use the rifle to shoot at different distances, you should opt for a variable magnification sight, while if the distances vary very little, with a fixed magnification view you have more than enough.

If you are going to use the rifle in low light conditions, I recommend that the reticle is illuminated so you can have a better view of where the point of impact is in low light conditions. You can find both fixed increase and variable increase.

The more increases the scope has, the more difficult it will be to have it stable because of the vibrations we make when holding it, so it is not necessary to have any increases if later it will cost you to hit the target.

If you can afford it, look for German, Austrian or Swiss telescopic sights, and as a second option those manufactured in the United States. In my experience, do not trust Chinese brands because they can give you a hare.

If you are looking for a telescopic sight that is polyvalent, I recommend a fixed magnification of 6 x 42. In the case that you look for a precision sight, I recommend that the reticle be fine.

How to calibrate a telescopic scope

Before zeroing your telescopic sight, you must mount it on the rifle. For this, I recommend that you place it in a place where it does not move and stay fixed so that the assembly is the best possible. Once you have done this, you have to place it on the mount, and the rings, whose separation distance between the sight and the rifle should be about 1.5 “, and tighten it leaving it slightly loose.

To align it concerning the rifle you have to find that the rifle’s rifle point coincides with the center of the point of the scope and that is where you must make the last adjustments to tighten the rings and leave it fastened.

Once you have mounted the rifle sight, you only have to go to the shooting range and do the tests to calibrate it. I leave a video so you can see visually how to do it in a fast and straightforward way.

Distance to calibrate a telescopic scope

The range to calibrate a telescopic scope will depend on the type of rifle barrel you have (not all rifles behave in the same way from certain distances), the ammunition and the kind of shot that you will generally perform.

If you are going to shoot from a distance of 14 to 60 meters, I recommend you calibrate the sight at 40 meters so that the margin of error is minimal in the minimum and maximum distance.

If instead, you want to shoot at longer distances, the first thing you have to take into account is if your cannon can make effective shots at that distance and then you should see if the ammunition is effective at those distances. You can see an example in the attached image of the caliber 308 Winchester.

Anyway, I leave you a video where you can see both the way to zero your rifle as well as the process to calibrate the scope telescope over long distances.

Conclusion 

As you have been able to verify, calibrating a telescopic sight is not a complicated task, and I hope that, with the information and the steps to follow that I offer you in this article, I will help you to do it without problems. Remember that the diameter of the pupil of a normal eye is 7mm so if you want to make an optimal opening rule of the objective you can divide the diameter of the target between the increases, the number 7 not exceeding the result.